Colonial America Resources and Information

Resources about the Early Colonies Resources about Colonial Roanoke NPS Historical Handbook: Fort Raleigh: An authoritative history of the Roanoke Colony and Fort Raleigh Resources about Colonial Jamestown Jamestown Rediscovery: Chart listing the names of all the original settlers and their occupations. Virtual Jamestown: Great resource offering teaching tips, maps, a 3-D Indian village, timelines, …

Facts about Pharoahs for Kids

The title originates in the Egyptian term pr ˤ3, literally “great house”, describing the royal palace. Historically, however, “pharaoh” only started being used as a title for the king during the New Kingdom, specifically during the middle of the eighteenth dynasty, after the reign of Hatshepsut. Pharaoh, meaning “Great House”, originally referred to the king’s …

Facts about the Boston Massacre for Kids

The Boston Massacre, known as the Incident on King Street by the British, was an incident on March 5, 1770, in which British Army soldiers killed five male civilians and injured six others. The incident was heavily propagandized by leading patriots, such as Paul Revere and Samuel Adams to fuel animosity toward the British authorities. …

Facts about the Cotton Gin for Kids

A cotton gin is a machine that quickly and easily separates cotton fibers from their seeds, allowing for much greater productivity than manual cotton separation. Although simple handheld roller gins have been used in India and other countries since at least 500 AD, the first modern mechanical cotton gin was created by American inventor Eli …

A Brief History of the Cold War

The Cold War occurred between the United States and the Soviet Union spanned from shortly after World War II ended until the early 1990s. The conflict was a power struggle between the two countries, with the main theme being the U.S. trying to promote and spread democracy while the Soviet Union was trying to promote …

Top 10 Youngest and Oldest Nobel Prize Winners

The Nobel Prize is an international award administered by the Nobel Foundation in Stockholm, Sweden. It is founded by Alfred Nobel, a Swedish chemist, inventor and engineer. There are six Nobel winner categories: Physics, Chemistry, Economic Sciences, Medicine, Literature, and Nobel Peace Prize. Top 10 Youngest Nobel Prize Winners 1. William Lawrence Bragg (UK) Date …

The American Civil War: Facts, Timeline, and Resources

When Did the Civil War Start? The American Civil War started on April 12, 1861. When Did the Civil War end? The American Civil War ended on April 9, 1865 and the last shot ended June, 1865. Causes of the Civil War 1. There were many reasons for a Civil War to happen in America. …

What are traditional Mexican religious pilgrimages?

From medieval times until the present day, Christians have made pilgrimages to holy places, churches or sites where saints are said to have appeared or where miracles are believed to have taken place. Because Mexico is a Catholic country, a large majority of the population makes religious pilgrimages each year to locations in Mexico where …

The Educational System of the 19th Century During the Civil War

In 19th century America, people believed that the education of children was essential. Most of the foundation for education began in the home. A popular book of the day, The Mother’s Book, by Lydia Child, recommended deliberate steps be taken to cultivate the early education of the child. With education beginning in the home, children …

How are anthropomorphism and humanism bound in Greek mythology?

Anthropomorphism in Greek mythology is the attribution of human form and character to the Greek gods. The word is derived from the Greek anthropos,meaning human being, and morphe, meaning shape. These gods are the ideal version of human beings, possessing great physical beauty, intense emotions and super human powers – primarily immortality. Anthropomorphism replaced the …

Whiskey Rebellion: Causes, History, and Resources

What was the Whiskey Rebellion? The Whiskey Rebellion was a popular uprising in 1794, but its roots go back to the Revolutionary War. The war created a huge amount of debt to the 13 states, and the federal government agreed to take on that debt in exchange for an agreement to move the new nation’s …

What caused Shays’ Rebellion?

Shays’ Rebellion began in the summer of 1786 and lasted through the spring of 1787. It took place in the western part of Massachusetts, although similar circumstances and responses were to be found in all 13 states that formed the new country. Led by Daniel Shays, a farmhand who had served in the Continental Army …

List of Famous Speeches Throughout History

American history is built on words that were once spoken and recorded in delicate detail. American oratory can speak beyond that specific moment and reach a crowd of millions through available speech and public address archives. The past becomes the present, as words from renowned speeches are recycled and used again to give meaning to …

Why did people go on pilgrimages in the Middle Ages?

A pilgrimage is a physical and a spiritual journey to a sacred site, either a church or a place where a saint may have appeared or a miracle is believed to have taken place. Most religions have the practice of the faithful making pilgrimages to holy places as a way to express their deep belief, …

Pony Express: History, Facts, and Resources

1. What is the Pony Express? The Pony Express was America’s first mail service that crossed the Great Plains and the Rocky Mountains. It spanned from Missouri to California. The Express was in service for around one and a half years from 1860 until 1861. Despite the fact that the pony express was a successful …

Plane Crashes of the 1970s

Commercial Plane Crashes in 1970 February 15 – Contaminated fuel causes dual engine failure shortly after takeoff from Las Américas International Airport near Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic in the Dominicana DC-9 air disaster; all 102 on board were killed. February 21 – A bomb in the cargo hold of Swissair Flight 330, a Convair CV-990, …

Causes of the Agricultural Revolution

What might be deemed the first agricultural revolution was when prehistoric man discovered how to cultivate his own food. This marked the move from a nomadic hunter-gatherer society to one of permanent settlements, villages, towns and eventually, cities. Another development that many historians consider to have been pivotal in the development of agriculture was the …

Shipwrecks: Resources and Their Effects on Sea Life

Worldwide, there have been more than 3 million shipwrecks since the first ship set sail that were either destroyed at sea or that ran aground due to storms, poor visibility, or poor navigation. Since the beginning of maritime history, ships have suffered at the hands of the vagaries of the climate, tides, tectonic movements, navigational …

Pearl Harbor Attack: Facts, History, Timeline, and Resources

History and Facts About the Attack on Pearl Harbor What events were leading up to the bombing of Pearl Harbor? In 1939 President Roosevelt cancelled the US trade agreement with Japan. In 1940, he imposed a trade embargo, halting exports to Japan of petroleum products including gas and lubricants, iron and steel scrap. In July …

Nina, Pinta, and Santa Maria: Facts, Song, and Resources

Having gotten permission and funds from Ferdinand and Isabella Columbus set about outfitting a little fleet for a trip across the “Ocean Sea” to find a faster route to China and India.Christopher Columbus departed from Spain on August 3, 1492, on a fleet of three ships: the Nina, the Pinta and the Santa Maria. Nina …

List of People Who Died During The Sinking of the Titanic

Titanic British passenger liner that sank on her maiden voyage on April 14–15, 1912. The largest vessel of her time, she was sailing from Southampton to New York when she struck an iceberg in the north Atlantic. How many people died in the titanic? 1,500 men and women drown; 54 of them were children. Below …

WW1: History and Facts For Kids

World War I, also known as the Great War and the War to End All Wars, started in 1914 and continued until 1918. At the time, it was called the Great War, because it was believed to be last war that would be fought between the nations. However, history would quickly show that this war …

Roman Architecture: History, Fun Facts, and Resources

Roman architecture refers to the buildings created during the height of the Roman empire. Design was a major facet of these buildings and often included specific details that made the building unique and beautiful. Columns or pillars, temple layouts, and the use of geometry were usually found in these buildings. There was also the use …

Fun Facts About The Articles of Confederation for Kids

The Articles of Confederation, formally the Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union, was an agreement among the 13 founding states that established the United States of America as a confederation of sovereign states and served as its first constitution. Its drafting by the Continental Congress began in mid 1776, and an approved version was sent …

Hiroshima Bombing: Timeline and Facts For Kids

There are not many events which affected the world like the bombing of Hiroshima on August 6, 1945. On this day, the 393rd Bombardment Squadron B-29 Enola Gray took off from an airbase in the west Pacific carrying the a-bomb, codenamed “Little Boy”. At 8:15 Hiroshima time, the bomb was dropped. It missed the Aioi …

The Growth of the United States During the 19th Century

At the time of the 19th century, the United States was essentially all rural. Less than six percent of the entire population of 5 million people lived in towns that were larger than 2,500 residents. The only cities with populations larger than 25,000 people were Philadelphia and New York City. When the Mississippi Valley and …

Facts about The Star Spangled Banner for Kids

The lyrics come from “Defense of Fort McHenry”, a poem written in 1814 by the 35-year-old lawyer and amateur poet, Francis Scott Key, after witnessing the bombardment of Fort McHenry by the British Royal Navy ships in Chesapeake Bay during the Battle of Fort McHenry in the War of 1812. The poem was set to …

The Silk Road History For Kids

What was the Silk Road The Silk Road was the name given to a vast network of trade routes beginning in China and extending across the continent of Asia, continuing through the Middle East and reaching lands of the Mediterranean, and eventually, North Africa and Europe. The Silk Road was not a single route, but …

List of Inventors: Inventions, Patent Number, Date of Invention

List of Inventors and Their Popular Inventions Albert Kingsbury Born Where: United States Field Of Study: Engineering, Invention Albert Kingsbury is famous for inventing what: Thrust Bearing Patent Number: 947,242 Date of Patent Issuance: January 25, 1910 Alessandro Volta Born Where: Italy Field Of Study: Chemistry, Physics Alessandro Volta is famous for inventing what: Electric …

The Crusades (1095-1798): Historical Timeline, Facts, and Resources

History of the Knights of the Crusades. When most people think of the Crusades, they think King Richard the Lion Heart, or knights in white with red crosses on them, or Orlando Bloom swinging a big sword on the big Hollywood screen. But the crusades go back further than that and have a bloody history. …

African Kings: List of the Most Popular Kings and Resources

Africa is a diverse and rich continent, and its people differ as much as its terrain. An escorted tour may take you to the deep jungles of the Amazon to the ancient pyramids of the ancient pharaohs. Its history is rich, and much can be learned of Africa today from reading of the kings of …

1950’s: History, Entertainment, Resources

The end of World War II had a tremendous impact on the culture of America all throughout the 50s. With new hope and the chance to start a new life with a family, home and other luxuries, the 1950s were a time of prosperity and enjoyment of pastimes. Discover what life was like from 1950-1959 …

Cherokee Indians: Facts and Information

The Cherokee are a group of Native Americans who used to live in the southern part of the Appalachian Mountains. Their territories covered the western parts of North Carolina and South Carolina, the northern parts of Alabama and Georgia, the southwestern part of Virginia, and parts of Tennessee and Kentucky. Traditionally, the Cherokee were only …

French Revolution: Facts, Timeline, and Resources For Kids

Fun Facts about the French Revolution Historians and academics disagree when it comes to determining what actually started the French Revolution To some extent at least, it started because the France’s economic and intellectual development was not matched by social and political change. In the fixed order of the ancient regime, most bourgeois were unable …

Vikings: History and Facts For Kids

Vikings were a band of people that lived in the Scandinavian region. For over a thousand years the Viking culture was a land based culture of farmers and fishermen. As time progressed and food and land shortages began to become common place, the Vikings took to the sea to explore and to plunder. While more …

Labor Unions In America: History, Pros, Cons, and Resources

What are Labor Unions? Unions are recognized today as the legal representatives of workers in many industries. Unions have been a part of the American workplace since colonial times. Unions that existed in Europe at the time of the original settlers did make their way over to America. A brief look at the history of …

Humanism Affect on Renaissance Art of the 14th Century

How Did Humanism Affect Renaissance Art? The term “humanism,” in its historical sense, comprises an educational and cultural movement that swept through Europe during the 15th and 16th centuries. Beginning with a revival of classical educational principles based on ancient secular Latin texts, humanism developed into a social and political philosophy that went on to …

Facts about Slavery For Kids

Slavery is a system under which people are treated as property to be bought and sold, and are forced to work. Slaves can be held against their will from the time of their capture, purchase or birth, and deprived of the right to leave, to refuse to work, or to demand compensation. Historically, slavery was …

Boston Tea Party: Fun and Interesting Facts For Kids

Over three hundred cases of English tea were thrown into the harbor in Boston on December 16, 1773. Three ships that were docked at the harbor had the tea on board when a group of American colonists decided to dump the tea as a protest for their independence. Some of the colonists dressed up as …

13 Original Colonies: Facts, Order They Were Founded, and Resources

What were the original 13 colonies? When were they founded? What are the 13 original colonies in order? The original thirteen colonies were Connecticut, Delaware, Georgia, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, South Carolina, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island and Virginia. These Colonies were primarily located along the northeast coast of the current …

Harlem Renaissance: Fun Facts, Information, and Resources

What Was the Harlem Renaissance? A New York neighborhood called Harlem was the center of an African American cultural renaissance from the end of World War I until the mid-1930’s. Just prior to this period in history there was a surge of African Americans relocating from the South to New York. Harlem was the neighborhood …

People of the Stone Age: Fun Facts and Resources

What is the Stone Age “Stone Age” is a term used to refer to prehistoric times, beginning when humans started to make tools and weapons that were made of stone. The Bronze Age and the Iron Age followed. The Stone Age is divided into Paleolithic, Mesolithic and Neolithic periods, marking the progressive levels of sophistication …

List of Animals of the Stone Age

What Animals Lived During the Stone Age? The Stone Age was comprised of three dominant eras: the Paleolithic era, Mesolithic era, and the Neolithic era. These eras are also known as the Old Stone Age, Middle Stone Age, and New Stone Age respectively. The categorization of this age as the Stone Age derives from the …