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Facts about Carrots for Kids


  • Carrots are a root vegetable, usually orange in color, though purple, red, white, and yellow varieties exist.
  • The most commonly eaten part of a carrot is a taproot, although the greens are edible as well.
  • It is a domesticated form of the wild carrot Daucus carota, native to Europe and southwestern Asia.
  • It is a biennial plant which grows a rosette of leaves in the spring and summer, while building up the stout taproot, which stores large amounts of sugars for the plant to flower in the second year.
  • Only 3% of the β-carotene in raw carrots is released during digestion: this can be improved to 39% by pulping, cooking and adding cooking oil.
  • Together with onion and celery, carrots are one of the primary vegetables used in a mirepoix to make various broths.
  • In India carrots are used in a variety of ways, as salads or as vegetables added to spicy rice or daal dishes.
  • The most popular variation in north India is the Gaajar Kaa Halwaa carrot dessert, which has carrots grated and cooked in milk until the whole mixture is solid, after which nuts and butter are added.
  • Carrot salads are usually made with grated carrots in western parts with a seasoning of mustard seeds and green chillies popped in hot oil, while adding carrots to rice usually is in julienne shape.
  • The variety of carrot found in north India is rare everywhere except in Central Asia and other contiguous regions, and is now growing in popularity in larger cosmopolitan cities in South India.
  • Since the late 1980s, baby carrots or mini-carrots (carrots that have been peeled and cut into uniform cylinders) have been a popular ready-to-eat snack food available in many supermarkets.
  • Carrot juice is also widely marketed, especially as a health drink, either stand-alone or blended with fruits and other vegetables.
  • Carrots are useful companion plants for gardeners.
  • The carrot gets its characteristic and bright orange color from β-carotene, which is partly metabolized into vitamin A in humans.
  • The legend arose during the Battle of Britain when the RAF circulated a story about their pilots’ carrot consumption as an attempt to cover up the discovery and effective use of radar technologies in engaging enemy planes, as well as the use of red light (which does not destroy night vision) in aircraft instruments.
  • Carrot cultivars can be grouped into two broad classes, eastern carrots and western carrots.
  • Specimens of the eastern carrot that survive to the present day are commonly purple or yellow, and often have branched roots.
  • The purple colour common in these carrots comes from anthocyanin pigments.
  • The western carrot emerged in the Netherlands in the 17th century, from Iran with violet color, its orange color making it popular in those countries as an emblem of the House of Orange and the struggle for Dutch independence.