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Facts about The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel For Kids


The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel is a small spaniel classed as a toy dog by The Kennel Club and the American Kennel Club. It originated in the United Kingdom and is one of the more popular breeds in many countries.

  • Since 2000, it has grown in popularity in the United States and ranks as the 18th most popular pure-breed in the United States (2013 Registration Statistics).
  • The breed standard recognizes four colours: Blenheim (chestnut and white), Tricolor (black/white/tan), Black and Tan, and Ruby.
  • The expected average lifespan of a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel is under ten years.
  • The King Charles changed inordinately in the late 17th century, when it was interbred with flat-nosed breeds.
  • Attempts were made to recreate the original King Charles Spaniel as early as the turn of the 20th century, using the now extinct Toy Trawler Spaniels.
  • These attempts were documented by Judith Blunt-Lytton, 16th Baroness Wentworth, in the book “Toy Dogs and Their Ancestors Including the History And Management of Toy Spaniels, Pekingese, Japanese and Pomeranians” published under the name of the “Hon.
  • The first standard was created, based on a dog named “Ann’s Son” owned by Mostyn Walker, and the Kennel Club recognized the variety as “King Charles Spaniels, Cavalier type”.
  • In 1994, the American Cavalier King Charles Spaniel Club was created by a group of breeders to apply for recognition by the American Kennel Club.
  • The tail is usually not docked, and the Cavalier should have a silky coat of moderate length.
  • Cavaliers which have rich chestnut markings on a pearly white background are known as Blenheim in honor of Blenheim Palace, where John Churchill, 1st Duke of Marlborough, raised the predecessors to the Cavalier breed in this particular color.
  • Cavalier King Charles Spaniel features According to statistics released by The Kennel Club, Cavaliers were the sixth most popular dog in the United Kingdom in 2007 with 11,422 registrations in a single year.
  • Although symptoms of syringomyelia can present at any age, they typically appear between six months and four years of age in 85% of symptomatic dogs, according to Clare Rusbridge, a research scientist.