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Facts About The Dachshund for Kids


  • The standard size dachshund was developed to scent, chase, and flush out badgers and other burrow-dwelling animals, while the miniature dachshund was bred to hunt smaller prey such as rabbits.
  • In the United States, they have also been used to track wounded deer and hunt prairie dogs.
  • Dachshunds also participate in conformation shows, field trials and many other events organized through pure bred dog organizations such as the American Kennel Club (AKC).
  • According to the AKC, the dachshund remains one of the top 10 dog breeds in the United States.
  • Although “dachshund” is a German word, in modern German they are more commonly known by the name Dackel or, among hunters, Teckel.
  • While classified in the hound group or scent hound group in the United States and Great Britain, the breed actually has its own group in the countries which belong to the Fédération Cynologique Internationale.
  • According to kennel club standards, the miniature differs from the full-size only by size and weight, thus offspring from miniature parents must never weigh more than the miniature standard to be considered a miniature as well.
  • Light-colored dachshunds can sport amber, light brown, or green eyes; however, kennel club standards state that the darker the eye color, the better.
  • Blue eyes, partially blue eyes, or a blue eye and a brown eye are called “wall” coloring, and are considered a non-desirable trait in kennel club standards.
  • A 2008 University of Pennsylvania study of 6,000 dog owners who were interviewed indicated that dogs of smaller breeds were more likely to be “genetically predisposed towards aggressive behavior”.
  • The first verifiable references to the dachshund, originally named the “Dachs Kriecher” (“badger crawler”) or “Dachs Krieger” (“badgerwarrior”), came from books written in the early 18th century.
  • A theory is that the standard longhair dachshund was developed by breeding smooth dachshunds with various land and water spaniels.
  • There is a possibility the wire-haired dachshund was a cross between the smooth dachshund and various hard-coated terriers and wire-haired pinschers, such as the Schnauzer, the Dandie Dinmont Terrier, the German Wirehaired Pointer, or perhaps the Scottish Terrier.