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Facts about Dublin for Kids


Dublin meaning “town of the hurdled ford”, is the capital and most populous city of Ireland. The English name for the city is derived from the Irish name Dubhlinn, meaning “black pool”. Dublin is situated near the midpoint of Ireland’s east coast, at the mouth of the River Liffey and the centre of the Dublin Region.

  • Originally founded as a Viking settlement, it evolved into the Kingdom of Dublin and became the island’s principal city following the Norman invasion.
  • The city expanded rapidly from the 17th century; it was briefly the second largest city in the British Empire and the fifth largest in Europe.
  • Following the partition of Ireland in 1922, the new parliament, the Oireachtas, was located in Leinster House.
  • Similar to the cities of Cork, Limerick, Galway, and Waterford—Dublin is administered separately from its respective County with its own City Council.
  • The name Dublin comes from the Irish name Dubhlinn or Duibhlinn, meaning “black pool”.
  • The original pronunciation is preserved in the names for the city in other languages such as Old English Difelin, Old Norse Dyflin, modern Icelandic Dyflinn and modern Manx Divlyn.
  • Determined to make Dublin a Protestant city, Queen Elizabeth I of England established Trinity College in 1592 as a solely Protestant university and ordered that the Catholic St.
  • Patrick’s and Christ Church cathedrals be converted to Protestant.
  • As the city continued to prosper during the 18th century, Georgian Dublin became, for a short period, the second largest city of the British Empire and the fifth largest city in Europe, with the population exceeding 130,000.
  • Dublin grew even more dramatically during the 18th century, with the construction of many famous districts and buildings, such as Merrion Square, Parliament House and the Royal Exchange.
  • Dublin suffered a period of political and economic decline during the 19th century following the Act of Union of 1800, under which the seat of government was transferred to the Westminster Parliament in London.
  • The Government of the Irish Free State rebuilt the city center and located the new parliament, the Oireachtas, in Leinster House.
  • Following the partition of Ireland in 1922, it became the capital of the Irish Free State (1922–1949) and now is the capital of the Republic of Ireland.
  • The President resides in Áras an Uachtaráin in the Phoenix Park, while both houses of the Oireachtas meet in Leinster House, a former ducal palace on Kildare Street.
  • The Irish Free State government took over the two wings of the building to serve as a temporary home for some ministries, while the central building became the College of Technology until 1989.
  • The Dublin region is the economic center of Ireland, and was at the forefront of the country’s rapid economic expansion during the Celtic Tiger period.
  • Dublin Airport is operated by the Dublin Airport Authority and is located north of Dublin City in the administrative county of Fingal.