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Facts about Ethiopia for Kids


Ethiopio is bordered by Eritrea to the north and northeast, Djibouti and Somalia to the east, Sudan and South Sudan to the west, and Kenya to the south. With over 90 million inhabitants, Ethiopia is the most populous landlocked country in the world, as well as the second-most populated nation on the African continent. It occupies a total area of 420,000 sq mi, and its capital and largest city is Addis Ababa.

  • Some of the oldest evidence for modern humans is found in Ethiopia, which is widely considered the region from which Homo sapiens first set out for the Middle East and points beyond.
  • Tracing its roots to the 2nd millennium BC, Ethiopia was a monarchy for most of its history.
  • Ethiopia derived prestige for its uniquely successful military resistance during the late 19th-century Scramble for Africa, and subsequently many African nations adopted the colors of Ethiopia’s flag following their independence.
  • The Ethiopian calendar, which is seven years and about three months behind the Gregorian calendar, co-exists alongside the Oromo calendar.
  • A majority of the population is Christian and a third is Muslim; the country is the site of the Hijrah to Abyssinia and the oldest Muslim settlement in Africa at Negash.
  • A substantial population of Ethiopian Jews, known as Beta Israel, resided in Ethiopia until the 1980s but most of them have since gradually emigrated to Israel.
  • In addition to this Cushite figure, two of the earliest Semitic kings are also said to have borne the name Ityopp’is according to traditional Ethiopian king lists.
  • A coin dated to 324 shows that Ethiopia was the second country to officially adopt Christianity, although the religion may have been at first confined to court circles; it was the first major power to do so.
  • Haile Selassie I was born to parents from three of Ethiopia’s Afro-Asiatic-speaking populations: the Oromo and Amhara, the country’s two largest ethnic groups, as well as the Gurage.
  • The Transitional Government of Ethiopia, composed of an 87-member Council of Representatives and guided by a national charter that functioned as a transitional constitution, was set up.
  • Within Ethiopia is a vast highland complex of mountains and dissected plateaus divided by the Great Rift Valley, which runs generally southwest to northeast and is surrounded by lowlands, steppes, or semi-desert.
  • Most of the country’s major cities are located at elevations of around 2,000–2,500 m (6,562–8,202 ft) above sea level, including historic capitals such as Gondar and Axum.
  • The Arabic form of this term (Al-Habasha) is the etymological basis of “Abyssinia,” the former name of Ethiopia in English and other European languages.
  • As with many other aspects of Ethiopian culture and tradition, tastes in music and lyrics are strongly linked with those in neighboring Eritrea, Somalia, Djibouti and Sudan.