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Facts about The Golden Retriever For Kids


The Golden Retriever is a large-sized breed of dog bred as gun dogs to retrieve shot waterfowl such as ducks and upland game birds during hunting and shooting parties, and were named ‘retriever’ because of their ability to retrieve shot game undamaged. Golden Retrievers have an instinctive love of water, and are easy to train to basic or advanced obedience standards.

  • They are a long-coated breed, with a dense inner coat that provides them with adequate warmth in the outdoors, and an outer coat that lies flat against their bodies and repels water.
  • Golden Retrievers are well suited to residency in suburban or country environments.
  • The breed’s friendly, gentle temperament means it is unsuited to being a professional guard dog, but its temperament has also made it the third-most popular family dog breed in the United States, the fifth-most popular in Australia, and the eighth-most popular in the United Kingdom.
  • As a dog with origins in pedigree breeding, and due to its widespread historical popularity, some regional variations have emerged in the breed; therefore, the three subtypes of the Golden Retriever reflect the typical variations in dimensions and coat.
  • Acceptable or expected weights are not specified in the UK standard, but the Kennel Club standard calls for a level topline and straight hindquarters without the slight rear angulation found in American lines.
  • British Golden Retrievers can have a coat colour of any shade of gold or cream; red or mahogany are not permitted.
  • Originally, cream was an unacceptable colour in the UK standard, but the standard was revised in 1936 to include cream.
  • American types are lankier and less muscular than other types, males stand between 23 and 24 inches in height at the withers; females are 21.5 to 22.5 inches tall.
  • Golden Retrievers are exceptionally trainable—due to their intelligence, athleticism and desire to please their handlers—and excel in obedience trials.
  • Golden Retrievers are known to have genetic disorders and other diseases.
  • In addition to the heavy shedding they experience (and their constant lighter shedding throughout the year), Golden Retrievers can suffer from skin diseases; the most prevalent skin problem is allergies, with the most common allergy being to fleas.
  • At that time, wildfowl hunting was a popular sport for the wealthy Scottish elite, but the existing retriever breeds were inadequate for retrieving downed game from both water and land.