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Facts about Honduras for Kids


  • It was at times referred to as Spanish Honduras to differentiate it from British Honduras, which became the modern-day state of Belize.
  • The country is bordered to the west by Guatemala, to the southwest by El Salvador, to the southeast by Nicaragua, to the south by the Pacific Ocean at the Gulf of Fonseca, and to the north by the Gulf of Honduras, a large inlet of the Caribbean Sea.
  • Much of the country was conquered by Spain who introduced its now predominant language and many of its customs in the sixteenth century.
  • It became independent in 1821 and has been a republic since the end of Spanish rule.
  • Its northern portions are part of the Western Caribbean Zone.
  • Higueras – a reference to the gourds that come from the Jicaro tree, many of which were found floating in the waters off the northwest coast of Honduras.
  • Honduras from fondura, a Leonese language word meaning anchorage which is one of the first words for the region to appear on a map in the second decade of the 16th century applied to the bay of Trujillo.
  • On his fourth and the final voyage to the New World in 1502, Christopher Columbus became the first European to visit the Bay Islands on the coast of Honduras.
  • Initially the mines were worked by local people through the encomienda system, but as disease and resistance made this less available, slaves from other parts of Central America were brought in, and following the end of the local slave trading period at the end of the sixteenth century, African slaves, mostly from Angola were obtained.
  • Although Honduras eventually adopted the name Republic of Honduras, the unionist ideal never waned, and Honduras was one of the Central American countries that pushed hardest for the policy of regional unity.
  • Since independence, nearly 300 small internal rebellions and civil wars have occurred in the country, including some changes of government.
  • The banana exporting companies, dominated by Cuyamel Fruit Company (until 1930), United Fruit Company, and Standard Fruit Company, built an enclave economy in northern Honduras, controlling infrastructure and creating self-sufficient, tax exempt sectors that contributed relatively little to economic growth.
  • There had been border tensions between the two countries after Oswaldo López Arellano, a former president of Honduras, blamed the deteriorating economy on the large number of immigrants from El Salvador.
  • A constituent assembly was popularly elected in April 1980 and general elections were held in November 1981.
  • A new constitution was approved in 1982 and the PLH government of Roberto Suazo assumed power.
  • During the early 1980s, the United States established a continuing military presence in Honduras with the purpose of supporting the Contra guerillas fighting the Nicaraguan government and also developed an air strip and a modern port in Honduras.
  • Though spared the bloody civil wars wracking its neighbors, the Honduran army quietly waged a campaign against Marxist-Leninist militias such as Cinchoneros Popular Liberation Movement, notorious for kidnappings and bombings, and many non-militants.
  • In any event the Honduran Supreme Court also ruled the proceedings to be legal.
  • The government that followed the De Facto Regime, set up a Truth Commission, Comision de la Verdad y Reconciliacion, which after more than a year of research and debate concluded the ousting to be a Coup D’État “to the executive power”, illegal in their opinion.
  • Manuel Zelaya of the Liberal Party of Honduras (Partido Liberal de Honduras: PLH) won, with Porfirio Pepe Lobo of the National Party of Honduras (Partido Nacional de Honduras: PNH) coming in second.
  • President Manuel Zelaya attempted to hold a “non-binding referendum” on 28 June asking voters if the upcoming November elections should include an additional ballot box.
  • This shifting and fluidity is common in Brazil where two-fifths of those who were raised evangelical are no longer evangelical and Catholics seem to shift in and out of various churches, often while still remaining Catholic.