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List of Vegetables and Facts for Kids


“Vegetable” comes from the Latin vegetabilis (animated) and from vegetare (enliven), which is derived from vegetus (active), in reference to the process of a plant growing. In culinary terms, a vegetable is an edible plant or its part, intended for cooking or eating raw.

  • Some vegetables can be consumed raw, some may be eaten cooked, and some must be cooked to destroy certain natural toxins or microbes in order to be edible, such as eggplant, unripe tomatoes, potatoes, daylily, winter melon, fiddlehead fern, and most kinds of legume/beans.
  • In 1967, the meaning of the term “vegetable” was specified to mean “plant cultivated for food, edible herb or root.”
  • The word “fruit” has a precise botanical meaning (a part that developed from the ovary of a flowering plant), which is considerably different from its culinary meaning, and includes many poisonous fruits.
  • While peaches, plums, and oranges are “fruit” in both senses, many items commonly called “vegetables” — such as eggplants, bell peppers, and tomatoes — are botanically fruits, while the cereals (grains) are both a fruit and a vegetable, as well as some spices like black pepper and chili peppers.
  • Languages other than English often have categories that can be identified with the common English meanings of “fruit” and “vegetable”, but their precise meaning often depends on local culinary traditions.
  • The list of food items called “vegetable” (found below) is quite long, and includes many different parts of plants: Flower bud Seeds Leaves Leaf sheaths Buds Stem Stems of leaves Stem shoots Tubers Whole-plant sprouts Roots Bulbs Fruits in the botanical sense, but used as vegetables Vegetables are eaten in a variety of ways, as part of main meals and as snacks.
  • The nutritional content of vegetables varies considerably, though generally they contain little protein or fat, and varying proportions of vitamins such as Vitamin A, Vitamin K and Vitamin B6, provitamins, dietary minerals and carbohydrates.
  • The USDA Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends consuming 3 to 5 servings of vegetables daily.
  • For most vegetables, one serving is equal to 1/2 cup and can be eaten raw or cooked.
  • For leafy greens, such as lettuce and spinach, a single serving is typically 1 cup.
  • Of all the world’s nations, China is the leading cultivator of vegetables, with top productions in potato, onions, cabbage, lettuce, tomatoesand broccoli.

List of Vegetables

  • Artichoke
  • Arugula
  • Asparagus
  • Avocado
  • Bamboo Shoots
  • Bean Sprouts
  • Beans
  • Beet
  • Belgian Endive
  • Bell Pepper
  • Bitter Melon/Bitter Gourd
  • Bok Choy/Bok Choi/Pak Choy
  • Broccoli
  • Brussels Sprouts
  • Burdock Root/Gobo
  • Cabbage
  • Calabash
  • Capers
  • Carrot
  • Cassava/Yuca
  • Cauliflower
  • Celery
  • Celery Root/Celeriac
  • Celtuce
  • Chayote
  • Chinese Broccoli/Kai-lan
  • Corn
  • Cucumber
  • Daikon Radish
  • Edamame
  • Eggplant/Aubergine
  • Elephant Garlic
  • Endive
  • Fennel
  • Fiddlehead
  • Galangal
  • Garlic
  • Ginger
  • Grape Leaves
  • Green Beans/String Beans/Snap Beans
  • Wax Beans
  • Amaranth Leaves/Chinese Spinach
  • Beet Greens
  • Collard Greens
  • Dandelion Greens
  • Kale
  • Kohlrabi Greens
  • Mustard Greens
  • Rapini
  • Spinach
  • Swiss Chard
  • Turnip Greens
  • Hearts of Palm
  • Horseradish
  • Jerusalem Artichoke/Sunchokes
  • Jícama
  • Kale
  • Kohlrabi
  • Leeks
  • Lemongrass
  • Lettuce
  • Lotus Root
  • Lotus Seed
  • Mushrooms
  • Napa Cabbage
  • Nopales
  • Okra
  • Olive
  • Onion: Green Onions/Scallions
  • Parsley
  • Parsley Root
  • Parsnip
  • Peas: Green peas, Sugar Snap Peas, Snow Peas
  • Peppers
  • Plantain
  • Potato
  • Pumpkin
  • Purslane
  • Radicchio
  • Radish
  • Rutabaga
  • Sea Vegetables
  • Shallots
  • Spinach
  • Squash
  • Sweet Potato
  • Swiss Chard
  • Taro
  • Tomatillo
  • Tomato
  • Turnip
  • Water Chestnut
  • Water Spinach
  • Watercress
  • Winter Melon
  • Yams
  • Zucchini