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Facts about Milwaukee Wisconsin for Kids


Milwaukee is the largest city in the state of Wisconsin, the 28th most populous city in the United States, and 39th most populous region in the United States. It is the county seat of Milwaukee County and is located on the southwestern shore of Lake Michigan.

  • Milwaukee is the main cultural and economic center of the Milwaukee–Racine–Waukesha Metropolitan Area with a population of 2,025,898 as of 2010.
  • In 1818, the French-Canadian explorer Solomon Juneau settled in the area, and in 1846 Juneau’s town combined with two neighboring towns to incorporate as the City of Milwaukee.
  • Known for its brewing traditions, major new additions to the city include the Milwaukee Riverwalk, the Delta Center (formerly “Frontier Airlines Center”), Miller Park, an internationally renowned addition to the Milwaukee Art Museum, Milwaukee Repertory Theater, and Pier Wisconsin, as well as major renovations to the U.S. Cellular Arena.
  • The Milwaukee area was originally inhabited by the Menominee, Fox, Mascouten, Sauk, Potawatomi, Ojibwe (all Algic/Algonquian peoples) and Ho-Chunk (Winnebago) (a Siouan people) Native American tribes.
  • Alexis Laframboise, in 1785, coming from Michilimackinac (now in Michigan) settled a trading post; therefore, he is the first European descent resident of the Milwaukee region.
  • Milwaukee began to grow as a city as high numbers of immigrants, mainly German, made their way to Wisconsin during the 1840s and 1850s.
  • Milwaukee lies along the shores and bluffs of Lake Michigan at the confluence of three rivers: the Menomonee, the Kinnickinnic, and the Milwaukee.
  • According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 96.80 square miles , of which, 96.12 square miles is land and 0.68 square miles is water.
  • Milwaukee is crossed by Interstate 43 and Interstate 94, which come together downtown at the Marquette Interchange.
  • Because Milwaukee’s official climate site, General Mitchell International Airport, is only 3 miles from the lake, seasonal variations in temperature are less extreme than in many other locations of the Milwaukee metropolitan area.
  • Because of its easy access to Lake Michigan and other waterways, Milwaukee’s Menomonee Valley has historically been home to manufacturing, stockyards, rendering plants, shipping, and other heavy industry.
  • Milwaukee’s Amtrak station was renovated in 2007 to create the Milwaukee Intermodal Station near downtown Milwaukee and the Third Ward to provide Amtrak riders access to Greyhound Lines and Jefferson Lines intercity bus transportation.