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Facts about Newfoundland and Labrador for Kids


  • Newfoundland and Labrador is the easternmost province of Canada.
  • Situated in the country’s Atlantic region, it incorporates the island of Newfoundland and mainland Labrador with a combined area of 156,500 sq mi.
  • Approximately 94 percent of the province’s population resides on the Island of Newfoundland, of which over half live on the Avalon Peninsula.
  • The province is Canada’s most linguistically homogenous, and 97.6% of residents reported English as their mother tongue in the 2006 census; however, this is the unique local dialect, Newfoundland English.
  • Historically, Newfoundland was also home to unique varieties of French, and Irish, as well as the now-extinct Beothuk language.
  • Newfoundland and Labrador’s capital and largest city, St. John’s, is Canada’s 20th-largest Census Metropolitan Area, and is home to nearly 40 percent of the province’s population.
  • St. John’s is the seat of government, home to the House of Assembly of Newfoundland and Labrador and the highest court in the jurisdiction, the Newfoundland and Labrador Court of Appeal.
  • A former colony and dominion of the United Kingdom, Newfoundland and Labrador became the tenth province to enter the CanadianConfederation on March 31, 1949, as Newfoundland.
  • On December 6, 2001, an amendment was made to the Constitution of Canada to change the province’s official name to Newfoundland and Labrador.
  • In day-to-day conversation, however, Canadians generally still refer to the province itself as Newfoundland and to the region on the Canadian mainland as Labrador.
  • The name Newfoundland is derived from English as “New Found Land”.
  • Labrador is the easternmost part of the Canadian Shield, a vast area of ancient metamorphic rock comprising much of northeastern North America.
  • St. John’s represents the east coast, Gander the interior of the island, Corner Brook the west coast of the island and Wabush the interior of Labrador.
  • The Maritime Archaic peoples were gradually displaced by people of the Dorset Culture and then by the Inuit in Labrador and the Beothuks on the island of Newfoundland.
  • After Calvert left, small-scale entrepreneurs such as Sir David Kirke made good use of the facilities.
  • After France lost political control of the area after the Siege of Port Royal in 1710, the Mí’kmaq engaged in warfare with the British throughout Dummer’s War, King George’s War, Father Le Loutre’s War and the French and Indian War.
  • On February 16, 1934, the Commission of Government was sworn in, ending 79 years of responsible government.
  • The EUP failed to gain much attention, and merged with the RGL after the first referendum.
  • Economic growth, gross domestic product (GDP), exports and employment resumed in 2010, after suffering the impacts of the late-2000s recession.