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Facts about the Bermuda Triangle for Kids


  • The triangle doesn’t exist according to the US Navy and the name is not recognized by the US Board on Geographic Names.
  • The area is one of the most heavily traveled shipping lanes in the world, with ships crossing through it daily for ports in the Americas, Europe, and the Caribbean Islands.
  • It is also a heavily flown route for commercial and private aircraft heading towards Florida, the Caribbean, and South America from points north.
  • In the February 1964 issue of Argosy, Vincent Gaddis’s article “The Deadly Bermuda Triangle” argued that Flight 19 and other disappearances were part of a pattern of strange events in the region.
  • Lawrence David Kusche, a research librarian from Arizona State University and author of The Bermuda Triangle Mystery: Solved (1975) argued that many claims of Gaddis and subsequent writers were often exaggerated, dubious or unverifiable.
  • Kusche’s research revealed a number of inaccuracies and inconsistencies between Berlitz’s accounts and statements from eyewitnesses, participants, and others involved in the initial incidents.
  • Kusche noted cases where pertinent information went unreported, such as the disappearance of round-the-world yachtsman Donald Crowhurst, which Berlitz had presented as a mystery, despite clear evidence to the contrary.
  • Another example was the ore-carrier recounted by Berlitz as lost without trace three days out of an Atlantic port when it had been lost three days out of a port with the same name in the Pacific Ocean.
  • Often his research was simple: he would review period newspapers of the dates of reported incidents and find reports on possibly relevant events like unusual weather, that were never mentioned in the disappearance stories.
  • The Coast Guard is also officially skeptical of the Triangle, noting that they collect and publish, through their inquiries, much documentation contradicting many of the incidents written about by the Triangle authors.
  • The crew of the sunken vessel noted the wind suddenly shifted and increased velocity from 20 mph to 60–90 mph.
  • However, according to other papers of theirs, no large releases of gas hydrates are believed to have occurred in the Bermuda Triangle for the past 15,000 years.