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Facts about Vancouver For Kids


Vancouver is the most populous city in the Canadian province of British Columbia. The Greater Vancouver area of around 2.4 million inhabitants is the third most populous metropolitan area in the country, the second largest city on the United States–Canada border, and the most populous in Western Canada.

  • Vancouver is one of the most ethnically and linguistically diverse cities in Canada; 52% of its residents have a first language other than English.
  • The City of Vancouver encompasses a land area of about 114 square km, giving it a population density of about 5,249 people per 13,590 square mi.
  • With over 250,000 residents, Vancouver is the most densely populated Canadian municipality, and the fourth most densely populated city in North America behind New York City, San Francisco, and Mexico City.
  • As part of the land and political deal whereby the area of the townsite was made the railhead of the CPR, it was renamed “Vancouver” and incorporated shortly thereafter as a city, in 1886.
  • As of 2014, Port Metro Vancouver is the third largest port by tonnage in the Americas (displacing New York), 27th in the world, the busiest and largest in Canada, and the most diversified port in North America.
  • Vancouver is consistently named as one of the top five worldwide cities for livability and quality of life, and the Economist Intelligence Unit acknowledged it as the first city to rank among the top-ten of the world’s most liveable cities for five consecutive years.
  • The city takes its name from George Vancouver, who explored the inner harbor of Burrard Inlet in 1792 and gave various places British names.
  • This site, with its natural harbor, was selected in 1884 as the terminus for the Canadian Pacific Railway, to the disappointment of Port Moody, New Westminster and Victoria, all of which had vied to be the railhead.
  • A railway was among the inducements for British Columbia to join the Confederation in 1871, but the Pacific Scandal and arguments over the use of Chinese labour delayed construction until the 1880s.
  • The largest trees in Vancouver’s old-growth forest were in the Gastown area, where the first logging occurred, and on the southern slopes of False Creek and English Bay, especially around Jericho Beach.
  • The City of Vancouver is the most densely populated of Canadian municipalities having more than 5,000 residents.
  • Since the 1980s, immigration has drastically increased, making the city more ethnically and linguistically diverse; 52% do not speak English as their first language.
  • The city’s selection to co-host the 2010 Winter Olympics was also a major influence on economic development.