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Fact about Winter For Kids


  • At the winter solstice, the days are shortest and the nights are longest, with days lengthening as the season progresses after the solstice.
  • The Earth is tilted at an angle of 23.44 degrees to the plane of its orbit, and this causes different latitudes on the Earth to directly face the Sun as the Earth moves through its orbit.
  • When it is winter in the Northern Hemisphere, the Southern Hemisphere faces the Sun more directly and thus experiences warmer temperatures than the Northern Hemisphere.
  • From the perspective of an observer on the Earth, the winter Sun has a lower maximum altitude in the sky than the summer Sun.
  • Meteorological winter is the method of measuring the winter season used by meteorologists based on “sensible weather patterns” for record keeping purposes, so the start of meteorological winter can change depending on how far north one lives.
  • The coldest average temperatures of the season are typically experienced in January in the Northern hemisphere and in June or July in the Southern hemisphere.
  • Nighttime predominates the winter season, and in some regions it has the highest rate of precipitation as well as prolonged dampness because of permanent snow cover or high precipitation rates coupled with low temperatures, precluding evaporation.
  • A rare meteorological phenomenon encountered during winter is ice fog, which comprises ice crystals suspended in the air; it occurs only at very low temperatures, below −30 °C (−22 °F).
  • In Celtic nations such as Ireland and in Scandinavia, the winter solstice is traditionally considered as midwinter, with the winter season beginning 1 November, on All Hallows, or Samhain.
  • Cultural influences such as Christmas creep may have led to the winter season being perceived as beginning earlier in recent years, although high latitude countries like Canada are usually well into their real winters before the December solstice.
  • The hibernal season coincides with the main period of biological dormancy each year whose dates vary according to local and regional climates in temperate zones of the Earth.
  • The appearance of flowering plants like the crocus can mark the end of the ecological winter as early as late January in mild temperate climates.
  • To survive the harshness of winter, many animals have developed different behavioral and morphological adaptations for overwintering: Migration is a common effect of winter upon animals, notably birds.
  • Other annual plants require winter cold to complete their life cycle, this is known as vernalization.